Reenactments

From live combat sword fighting to the 18th century Highlanders of Darien and Clan Nan Con,  the Scottish Games reenactments are not to be missed.

The Savannah branch of the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism) will be host interactive demonstrations and displays of a variety of medieval European activities throughout the day. Stop by for armored combat, dance, juggling, and all sorts of arts activities.

 

​The SCA is a practical history society, recreating the arts and skills of pre-17th century Europe. While dressed in clothing of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, you can experience tournaments, royal courts, feasts, and dancing. You will also have the opportunity to learn and practice ancient arts and skills — calligraphy, cooking, armoring, metalworking, carpentry, and needlework (to name just a few) — within an all-ages social group.

 

Fort King George is the oldest English fort on Georgia's coast. From 1721 until 1736, Fort King George was the southern outpost of the British Empire in North America. A cypress blockhouse, barracks and palisaded earthen fort were constructed in 1721 by scouts led by Colonel John “Tuscarora Jack” Barnwell. For the next seven years, His Majesty’s Independent Company garrisoned the fort. They endured incredible hardships from disease, threats of Spanish and Indian attacks, and the harsh, unfamiliar coastal environment. After the fort was abandoned, General James Oglethorpe brought mostly Gaelic speaking Scottish Highlanders to the site in 1736. The Highlanders of Darien were instrumental in the Battle of bloody Marsh and in the War of Jenkins Ear. The Highland Independent Company of Darian is on record as being the first kilted regiment based outside the island of Brittan.  The Highland settlement of Darien eventually became a foremost export center of lumber until 1925. Today the Park Rangers of Fort King George offer blacksmithing, woodworking, colonial medical, artillery and musket demonstrations dressed as period Redcoat Soldiers, Sailors, Scots, and Civilians from the 18th century.